Political Intrigue. Influence. Sinful Feasts.

POWEL HOUSE

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JB Powel House.jpg
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Elizabeth Powel and George Washington courtesy American Historical Theater. Photo by Kyle Cassidy.

Powel Ballrooom
Powel Ballrooom

Photo by Kyle Cassidy

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EP Miniature from KyleCassidy.jpg

Check out Executive Director, Jonathan Burton's tour of Powel House on NBC'S Open House! 

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Virtual Tour

 

Elizabeth Willing Powel didn’t just entertain the political elite with lavish meals; she had a strong voice and became one of Washington’s closest confidants during his presidency, advising him on issues both personal and political. Her husband Samuel, despite his Colonial-revival moniker of "Patriot Mayor," took a more measured attitude towards Independence, signing the Oath of Allegiance days before the British withdrew their troops from occupied Philadelphia. (The Powels remained at their city residence even while the Earl of Carlisle occupied their bedchamber!) One of the finest examples of Georgian architecture in the United States, it was built in 1765 by merchant and businessman Charles Stedman. It later stood witness as the neighborhood around it deteriorated and industrialized. The property was used for manufacturing and warehousing by owner Wolf Klebanksy at the turn of the 19th C. By 1931, under threat of demolition, the house was purchased and became the flagship property of the Philadelphia Society for the Preservation of Landmarks. Later restored and opened as a museum dedicated to Colonial Revivalism, it played an integral role in the redevelopment of Society Hill into one of the nation’s premier heritage neighborhoods just blocks from Independence Hall.

 

Famous Visitors during the Powel residency included George & Martha Washington, Benjamin Rush, Benjamin Franklin, the Marquis de Lafayette and John Adams, who wrote of his enjoyment of a "most sinful feast" after a particular visit. 

During the early 20th century, Klebansky sold much of the interior architectural detail to the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Original architecture elements can be viewed in the Powel Room at both museums. 


 

 

Looking for more information on Elizabeth Willing Powel and her relationship with George Washington? Mount Vernon's digital encyclopedia can be accessed HERE

LOCATION

244 South Third Street
Philadelphia, PA 19106

If you are interested in renting Powel House for a Private Event an appointment for touring the property is required. 

 

Please fill out this form to schedule your tour. 

PHONE
215-627-0364

 

EMAIL
powelhouse@philalandmarks.org

 

PUBLIC HISTORY TOUR HOURS

Public history tours are available on the hour

11:00 AM - 3:00 PM (last tour begins at 3:00pm)

Thursday-Saturday April-November

 

12:00 to 3:00 PM (last tour at 3:00pm) on Sundays April-November

Weekends only (Saturday/Sunday) in March and December.

*Last two weekends of December closed. 

January and February by appointment only.

All other times by appointment.

 

ADMISSION 
$8 General admission
$6 Students and Seniors
$20 per Family


Free for all PhilaLandmarks Members 

    

Groups of 10 or more may tour the house by appointment,

with group rates available. 

 

School groups should contact our executive director at 215.925.2251 ext 200

 

NOTE: Open hours may be limited due to special events.

Please call  (215) 627-0364 to check availability. RSVPs are always welcome.